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Fri, 07 Aug 2020

A Chess Puzzle

Chess is one of the oldest games that is still popular today. And it continues to go from strength to strength.


Whilst there are several rules to learn with regard to how the pieces can move, taking manoeuvres, castling, check and so on, this pales into insignificance when compared to the strategies that can be learned.

Chess is a game with such depth that it takes a great many years to truly become great at chess, and indeed some of the greatest chess grandmasters are said to have been able to 'see' in their head an astonishing number of moves ahead and the implications of a particular move now several moves later.

However, the good news is that chess puzzles can be a lot simpler than that! And here is a straightforward chess puzzle for you.

Look at the image to the right. You will see that there are five lettered squares: A, B, C, D and E respectively. Two squares contain numbers: a 2 and a 3. These indicate how many pieces are attacking those squares.

A to E represent one each of a knight, king, queen, rook (castle) and bishop in some order. Your task is simply to work out which is which. Remember that a piece cannot attack a square if the attack route is through another square.

Can you work out which letter represents each of the five pieces above? You'll need to know how the five chess pieces move in order to solve this puzzle, but there are plenty of excellent guides to the rules of chess elsewhere online, so if you're not sure please check one of those before attempting to solve this puzzle!
Date written: 29 Nov 2010

Category: chess | Keywords: chess


Puzzle Videos: Learn to Solve

Consecutive Sudoku Rules
The rules of this unusual sudoku variant are explained in this video - they can be really fun to solve but you need to understand what the bars between squares mean and that all are shown...



Not tried consecutive sudoku before but like to give it a go? You can play the puzzle featured in the video via this link: Play Consecutive Sudoku Online


Read about other Puzzles




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